Technology

Lolo Lids the Ultimate Beer Koozie

A-Stealth-Beer-Koozie-That-Makes-It-Look-Like-You--re-DrinkingrareThe Lolo Lid is a stealth beer koozie that allows you to drink beer while out in public as it will make it look like you’re just drinking coffee. It’s a special lid that holds on to a standard can of beer. You then have to attach it to a paper coffee cup to turn the whole thing into a beer-insulating Koozie that looks like a coffee cup. And if you want your own, you’ll have to pledge $20.
Kick starter here https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1710984265/lolo-lids-the-ultimate-beer-koozie

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Bicycle Bottle System Condenses Humidity From Air Into Drinkable Water

Drinkable waterThe weight of water limits how much can be brought on a long bike ride. There isn’t always an option to stop and fill up from a clean stream or drinking fountain, but water could be obtained from a different source: the air. Austrian industrial design student Kristof Retezár has created Fontus: a prototype of a water bottle system that condenses humid air into clean, drinkable water. His design made him a finalist for the 2014 James Dyson Award.

The Fontus attaches to the bicycle frame and consists of a condenser unit and a bottle for collection. There is a solar panel on top of the unit that powers the condenser. As the motion of the bike causes air to blow into a channel, the moist air is cooled, causing it to condense. The droplets roll back down the condensing unit, collecting in a water bottle mounted underneath.

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Lapka Bam Breathalyzer

The Lapka BAM($200) is a breathalyzer. It measures the amount of alcohol in your blood through your breath and connects with your phone to give you a reading. The elegant Breathalyzer fits in your palm and doesn´t require a mouthpiece, and take a deep breath and blow into it for 4 seconds. And the design is a super minimalist black ceramic cylinder. The result will be be wirelessly transmitted to your phone´s app, give you a reading.

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19-year-Old Inventor Finds Way to Clean Up the World’s Oceans in Under 5 Years Time

Ocean-Cleanup-Array-Boyan-Slat-706x369
Previously the idea of cleaning up the world’s oceans with their vast accumulations of disposed plastic material was considered an impossibility. Now a 19-year-old inventor says he and his foundation has a way to clean up the world’s oceans, and not only does he say we can do it, but that we can do it in five years time and produce a profit from it.

It is called the ‘Great Pacific Garbage Patch’ or sometimes the “Pacific Trash Vortex”, and it is a massive collection of plastic particles accumulating in the Pacific. Other oceans have their own collections of plastic wastes as well; furthermore, most of the debris in our oceans are plastic materials that accounts for approximately 90% of all the waste debris. (more…)

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Intel Is Reportedly Going To Destroy The Cable Model By Offering People The Ability To Subscribe To Individual Channels

intel-smart-tv-subway-adRARE

Intel is reportedly on the cusp of delivering something that consumers around the world have been wanting for a long, long time.

Kelly Clay at Forbes reports Intel is going to blow up the cable industry with its own set-top box and an unbundled cable service.

Clay says Intel is planning to deliver cable content to any device with an Internet connection. And instead of having to pay $80 a month for two hundred channels you don’t want, you’ll be able to subscribe to specific channels of your choosing.

Here’s the key paragraph:

This set-top box, said by industry insiders to be available to a limited beta of customers in March, will offer cable channels delivered “over the top” to televisions anywhere there is an Internet connection regardless of provider. (Microsoft Mediaroom, for example, requires AT&T’s service, and Xbox has limited offerings for Comcast and FiOS customers). For the first time, consumers will be able to subscribe to content per channel, unlike bundled cable services, and you may also be able to subscribe per show as well. Intel’s set-top box will also have access to Intel’s already existing app marketplace for apps, casual games, and video on demand. Leveraging the speed of current broadband, and the vast shared resources of the cloud, Intel plans to give customers the ability to use “Cloud DVR”, a feature intended to allow users to watch any past TV show at any time, without the need to record it ahead of time, pause live tv, and rewind shows in progress.

This is a holy-grail of sorts for people that subscribe to cable.

We’ve been skeptical of Intel’s ability to make a dent in the TV market. If it somehow manages to deliver this unbundled channel option, we’re more optimistic Intel could have success.

Before anyone gets too excited, Janko Roettgers at GigaOm is skeptical it happens. Roettgers knows the TV business very well.

The reason its unlikely to happen is that content companies don’t really want to see cable blown up. It’s been very good to them.

Last summer, Peter Kafka at All Things D poured cold water on the idea of Intel unbundling. Not only is going to be hard to make it happen, it’s unclear if it would even save money for cable subscribers:

Those bundles are core to today’s TV ecosystem. And the TV guys insist that consumers really don’t want “a la carte” programming, because if they do, the channels/shows they like today will end up costing much, much more.

Disney, for instance, charges TV distributors about $5 for every subscriber that gets ESPN. And, by some estimates, only about 25 percent of cable customers actually watch ESPN on a regular basis. So if you unbundled ESPN, the per-subscriber cost might shoot up to $20 or more, to account for the 75 percent drop in its customer base.

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